Japan
Automobile
Manufacturers
Association, Inc.

Issue No. 1, 2011

JAMA urges the EU and Japan to formulate an Economic Integration Agreement as a priority task

In the context of the European Commission’s new Trade Strategy presented in November 2010, JAMA submitted a contribution to a public consultation on the future of EU-Japan trade and economic relations.  JAMA reiterated its call for an ambitious and wide-ranging Economic Integration Agreement (EIA) to be reached between the two economies, which would strengthen trade, stimulate economic growth and create jobs.

Moreover, JAMA argues that such an EIA would safeguard balanced competitiveness in the EU market following the recent signing of the EU-South Korea Free Trade Agreement, which JAMA believes has left its members at a competitive disadvantage compared to Korean automakers. 


The 8th Global Commercial Vehicle Industry Meeting in Chicago

On 16 November 2010, the top executives of the leading Japanese, European and American manufacturers of heavy-duty commercial vehicles and engines, plus representatives of JAMA, ACEA, EMA and TMA, met in Chicago to discuss fuel efficiency improvements and greenhouse gas reductions as well as topics related to the certification of heavy-duty engines and vehicles.
Accordingly, the manufacturers agreed to pursue global efforts targeting the development of harmonised fuel specifications and common vehicle testing and certification procedures.  They also called for increased cooperation among European, Japanese and American regulators, stressing the need for a worldwide approach to shared challenges in order to better serve customers and the global environment.


Feature article: Fuel ECOnomy
By Peter Nunn

If there’s one word that resonates strongly across Japan’s car industry these days, it has to be ‘eco’.  As Japanese buyers tune in more and more to ‘eco’, manufacturers are responding.  Recently introduced to the market in Japan are a number of new cars that set extraordinary new standards for fuel efficiency.  These latest fuel-sipping offerings in Japan show how fast the technology is moving.